Common misperceptions about conservative feminism

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Saturday, July 2, 2022


I was 16 years old during the 2016 election when Hilary Clinton and Donald Trump squared off, eventually sending Donald Trump to the White House. As a sophomore in high school with a limited scope of knowledge surrounding government and party politics in America, I was shocked by how divisive the result of the election was and by how strongly high school students felt about Trump’s win. 

This was a turning point for me. This was the moment that inspired me to dig deeper and learn about the issues that divide our nation.

As I have gotten older and educated myself about politics, I have developed a sense of where I personally stand and where my beliefs lie: a young woman who identifies with a conservative worldview.

I believe there are many common misperceptions about what it means to be a conservative woman in today’s society that hold women back from self-identifying as conservative.

Conservative women are often accused by the left as being “anti-women.” For most conservative women, family is a core value. Women are, of course, an integral part of the family unit, whether a woman in today’s society is single, married, a parent, or even perhaps a caretaker for her parents or older family members. The difference is that conservative women like myself see this role within their family unit as empowering, not holding us back.

Although conservative women have differing opinions from their liberal peers on some hot-button issues, there are issues where conservative and liberal women come together to advance women. Both sides of the aisle want women to have the chance to succeed in the workforce. We all want equal pay for women even if we might have different views on the current landscape or how to get there. While we may have different solutions to the issues we face, we all want the same end goal. 

Another misconception about modern conservative women is that they have been dubbed as being averse to change in an effort to strictly adhere to old-fashioned or traditional ideals. Today’s conservative women are often very open to change and support some social reforms.. There are issues that gain bipartisan support and should be pushed forward. 

For example, bipartisan policy surrounding occupational licensing reform would actually create more opportunities for all women. According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, a quarter of all jobs in the United States require an occupational license. 

This sort of impractical government regulation inhibits women from choosing to pursue a career path suited to their needs and ambitions. Reform would be mutually beneficial and empowering for women on both sides of the aisle. These are the types of policies where meaningful, bipartisan progress can be made.  

These misconceptions lead to the question of how conservative women fit into today’s world where there is significant divisiveness and animosity between groups with political differences. 

As a young conservative woman just beginning my post-college journey, I hope that women can move away from the divisiveness that has dominated our culture for decades, and is seemingly only getting worse. 

If we all ultimately have the same goal in mind, to support each other as women and solidify our place alongside men in our professional, political, and personal lives, why is there so much dispute on how to get there?

 

Abigail Daniels is a recent graduate of American University in Washington, DC where she studied communications and business administration. She was president of the Network of enlightened Women (NeW) chapter there and a graduate of the Opportunity Feminism Course, hosted by NeW. NeW is part of a growing conservative movement on college campuses.

The views expressed in this article are the opinion of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Lone Conservative staff.


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About Abigail Daniels

Abigail Daniels is a recent graduate of American University in Washington, DC where she studied communications and business administration. She was president of the Network of enlightened Women (NeW) chapter there and a graduate of the Opportunity Feminism Course, hosted by NeW. NeW is part of a growing conservative movement on college campuses.

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