HUNT: 5 Podcasts That Changed My Worldview

by

Tuesday, June 8, 2021


Podcasts can be hit-or-miss, but these five shows changed the way I saw the world around me:

Lexicon Valley
Join podcast host John McWhorter as he explores the nuance of language in one of the most engaging formats I’ve ever heard. For instance, there is an entire episode on the word “company.” Often using songs and old recordings, John takes the listener through the evolution of language and answers the common questions people might have, like, “Will people 500 years from now be able to read the form of English that we write today?” Not only does this podcast help embolden your understanding of your native language, it opens your world to the fascinating and complex ecosystem that is language. 

Hidden brain

Unlike most podcasts, Hidden Brain does not have a specific thematic avenue. Never boring and always explorative, this podcast will push the limits of how you perceive the world. Some weeks you will be exploring whether your brain is really left-brained or right-brained, and other weeks you will be encapsulated in the bizarre and horrifying story of a fake bride. No matter the episode, Hidden brain is going to push your acceptance of reality and challenge you to consider new facts and data and ponder the value of prior science. 

The Megyn Kelly show

Granted, I am active in politics, but over time my interest in political podcasts has waned. It quickly became information overload listening to multiple shows debating the same subject. But the one thing that sets The Megyn Kelly Show apart is her ability to ask hard questions and not simply push a party line. She always opens her show up to the opposite side and has had many guests on to debate each subject. From trans activists to the girls who sued because they lost athletic opportunities to trans girls, Kelly is not afraid of showing both sides. She truly provides a place to have an open and honest conversation and without sounding like she’s trying to push a specific narrative on you.

No Dumb Questions

What happens when you pair a rocket engineer with a pastor on one podcast? Well, you get an intellectual conversation that gets deep into the weeds of what makes people tick. No Dumb Questions feels like a conversation between two best friends and you’re a fly on the wall. Between learning about engineering and its immense depths, to understanding the power of storytelling, there are always philosophical nuggets from which to glean from hosts Matt and Destin. 

Cautionary Tales

This is by far one of the greatest podcasts currently available. Explore the strange world of dungeons & dragons and the fear that captured society in the latter part of the 20th century. Puzzle over whistleblowers and their actual societal utility. Learn the bizarre history of some of America’s finest mathematicians and what really sets Noble-winning scientists apart from the rest. Cautionary Tales’ host has the amazing ability to break down large concepts that we’ve all accepted as fact into bite-sized factual pieces which might just change your perception of the world.

Taylor Hunt is a third-year agricultural engineering student who advocates for the farming community. With her spare time, she stays busy writing for Lone Conservative, hiking, working, and playing with her baby cousin.

The views expressed in this article are the opinion of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Lone Conservative staff.


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About Taylor Hunt

Modesto Junior College

Taylor Hunt is a third-year agricultural engineering student who advocates for the farming community. With her spare time, she stays busy writing for Lone Conservative, hiking, working, and playing with her baby cousin.

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