There’s Only Two Sexes

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Sunday, January 10, 2021


There are only two sexes.

It’s basic biology, yet anyone aware of gender politics knows that it’s quite the controversial statement. I’ve personally been scoffed at just for suggesting it. In fact, even accused of being biologically illiterate for it.

At my college, there’s a discord server meant for the Class of 2024 to chat and bond while all of us are off-campus during the COVID-19 pandemic. During my first semester, I found myself under a lot of controversy since I’m a bold conservative at a very left leaning college. So as a result, I became the talk of the town in the discord server, and, as you can imagine, many used me as their go-to catharsis.

In one of their many discussions about me, I was labeled as “transphobic” for publicly stating that my college is a historically women’s college, meaning that not every student identifies as a woman. It’s a term mainly used by LGBTQ+ allies to express inclusion in a gender-segregated space, especially since my college welcomes anyone except for cis-men (males who identify as men) but still calls itself a women’s college. However, if a conservative explains that her college is described as a historically women’s college, she’s deemed as “transphobic”while everyone else is considered an ally.

In my classmates’ conversation, they mentioned how I said in an interview that there’s only two sexes, and someone replied, “She said that there’s only two sexes. There’s literally five biological sexes. Umm, biology???”

I’ll admit it. I laughed when I saw this comment. Not because that student’s unseasoned in biologyshe’s probably very smart. It’s just that she bought into some gender theory I was exposed to a year before, and, if she said that directly to me, I’d know how to refute it.

Flashback to my AP Psychology class in high school. We were learning about the psychology of gender, and, as a treat, my teacher invited the former chair of the Gender Studies department from the local university. 

The former chair gave us an introduction to what gender studies is, including the difference between sex and gender, toxic masculinity, transgenderism, and, of course, the Five Sexes Theory. 

The Five Sexes Theory, coined by Biology and Gender Studies Professor Anne Fausto-Sterling at Brown University, tears apart the dichotomy of the two traditional sexes, and proposes that there’s not two, but five sexes based on different cocktails of genitalia. These include male (testes), female (ovaries), herms (both testes and ovaries), merms (testes and some female genitalia but no ovaries), and ferms (ovaries and some male genitalia but no testes).

If you were absolutely perplexed reading that, don’t worry. I was too when I heard this. 

I remember my brain going fuzzy, squinting like an old lady trying to read, my eyes widening, and thinking, “Whhhhaaaatttt?” However, if you take a closer look into the science, the theory doesn’t hold up.

Contrary to popular belief, sex isn’t determined by our genitals. It’s not determined by our chromosomes or hormonal profiles either, but by our gametes, mature reproductive cells. There’s only two types of gametes: sperm and eggs. What gametes you produce determines your sex. If you produce sperm, you are male; if you produce eggs, you are female. There’s no intermediate type of gamete, which means that sex is binary (and therefore not a cocktail).

In order for Professor Fausto-Sterling to be right, sex has to be determined by our genitals, and that’s simply not the case; it’s determined by gametes.

Once again, it’s basic biology. You have to take gender studies or be exposed to gender ideology to know what the five sexes are, which many of my classmates are well versed in. However, even then, gender theories based on pseudo-biology don’t override biology. 

Lela Gallery is a student at Mount Holyoke College, a women’s college in western Massachusetts. When she isn’t studying, Lela can be caught catching up on the news, writing articles for Campus Reform and the College Fix, listening to true crime and horror podcasts, reading about politics, or trying out different local coffee shops.

The views expressed in this article are the opinion of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Lone Conservative staff.


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About Lela Gallery

Lela Gallery is a student at Mount Holyoke College, a women’s college in western Massachusetts. When she isn’t studying, Lela can be caught catching up on the news, writing articles for Campus Reform and the College Fix, listening to true crime and horror podcasts, reading about politics, or trying out different local coffee shops.

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