Trump’s Failed Georgia Strategy Costs GOP the Senate

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Wednesday, January 6, 2021


One of the biggest, most contentious election cycles in modern American history concluded with Georgia’s runoff elections for the two remaining Senate seats up for grabs. The stakes were incredibly high as both parties fought to control the future of the Senate. Democrats needed to win both seats in order for the Senate to be split and win, they did. Both races were extremely tight from start to finish but eventually, the results looked eerily similar to those in November. With 99% of the votes being reported, the AP projects Raphael Warnock (D) will defeat Kelly Loeffler (R); and 33-year-old Jon Ossoff (D), will upend David Perdue, the Republican incumbent. Now that the Senate is 50-50, Vice-President Elect Kamala Harris becomes the deciding vote on future matters, providing a green light for much of the progressive agenda coming from the far left within the Democrat Party. 

Regardless of your thoughts on the November Presidential Election, it’s safe to say the tides of American politics have officially changed from what they were just four years ago. In 2016, the president was able to muster huge waves of support from moderate to traditionally right voters who felt they had been left behind by the ‘system’. Now, it is they who have been left behind and Trump, himself, is responsible.

At some point, Republicans and Trump supporters will have to stop pointing fingers at supposed “widespread voter fraud” and find strategies to move forward. Yes, it’s quite obvious the mainstream media is responsible for handing Joe Biden an advantage in the minds of many undecided voters but that has been built into the cake for some time. But that is in the past and now, so is Mitch McConnell’s time as Senate majority leader.  

While campaigning in Georgia in the week-long buildup to the election, Trump had every opportunity to promote Kelly Loeffler and David Perdue as individuals rather than tying them so closely to himself. But Trump has proven time and time again, he is unable to step out of the spotlight. Yes, he did ask his supporters to go out and vote for the two of them but that support was already guaranteed. In order for Republicans to win, it’s quite clear Trump needed to take a step back, knowing he was on his last legs. Instead, Trump spun much of the campaign’s focus on the supposed rigging of the November election, to ill effect.

As a result, there was no additional motivation to turn out and vote for the two Republicans in the Senate race. Exit polling data truly shows the fault line created within the Republican party by Trump, whether intentional or not. Traditional red voters turned out in Georgia, including middle-aged white voters and suburban women. But many of Trump’s staunchest supporters willingly decided to not vote at all, still furious about the president’s loss. A lack of excitement for either candidate combined with not being able to move on from November led to the perfect storm, one that can only be characterized by a gnashing of teeth within the GOP. 

I refuse to jump the gun and say one state’s election is an example of a national disdain for Trump. After all, he did make great strides amongst minority voters, particularly in Florida with the Cuban vote and the Black vote across the nation. But strategies aren’t like umbrellas; they don’t work the same for every troublesome situation. If a historically deep-red state does not vote for the Republican presidential nominee, continuing to promote him as the saving grace of the party may be a losing idea. It was quite clear from the beginning, if this was a referendum on the far-left policies the Democrat Party is trending towards, they would likely lose. But if this was a referendum on Trump’s character, as it clearly was in November, the GOP would be left in a massive hole. 

Apparently, this was not obvious enough and now, Republicans are left wondering what went wrong? Unfortunately, nothing is going to change. Those that deeply support Trump will say it’s not his fault and still wake up every day only to blame the devastating losses on massive voter fraud and underground ploys. “We want free and fair elections!”, they proclaim. Well, in order to win those free and fair elections, you have to garner support outside of Trump’s already established base. Trump failed to do this. The GOP failed to do this. Today, they must acknowledge their refusal to move on from Trump in November, costing them two senate seats and control of the only thing that could act as a stalwart against Biden’s presidency. 

Ryan Rogers is originally from Fort Mill, SC, and is currently a Senior at Clemson University. He is majoring in Economics with a minor in Political & Legal Theory. After graduation in December, he plans to pursue a career in political journalism. Ryan is passionate about Op-ed writing, politics, US history, and European football.

The views expressed in this article are the opinion of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Lone Conservative staff.


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About Ryan Rogers

Ryan Rogers is originally from Fort Mill, SC, and is currently a Senior at Clemson University. He is majoring in Economics with a minor in Political & Legal Theory. After graduation in December, he plans to pursue a career in political journalism. Ryan is passionate about Op-ed writing, politics, US history, and European football.

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