Marxist Indoctrination in Brazilian Schools

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Thursday, December 3, 2020


Brazil is considered a mediocre performer in education, not just in South America but in the world as a whole. A good portion of Brazil’s poor performance can be attributed to the inclusion of Marxist ideology in the classroom, from kindergarten through college. 

But where does the Marxist indoctrination in Brazilian schools come from? 

Sure, there are numerous teachers (especially in the subjects of the humanities) that come into the classroom with the intent to carry out militancy and indoctrination, but that is not the main problem. The failed and evil ideology of Marxism has been injected into both the Brazilian curriculum and into the overall philosophy of how education should be done and what its goal is. 

To understand this, we need to go back in time a few decades, to examine a man named Paulo Freire. To this day, he is admired and respected by the vast majority of people working in education, as well as students and those left-leaning in the general population. Perhaps the most emblematic example of how Paulo Freire is adored by the nation’s educators and left-wingers is that he is recognized by law as the patron of Brazilian education. 

Freire was put in charge of the Ministry of Education in Brazil in the late 1980s after having reasonable success in his method of teaching illiterate adults by using a constructivist method and a considerable spell in prison for opposing the military dictatorship. In a traditional teaching setting, the teacher imparts his or her knowledge to the students as they soak it in. Constructivism breaks from that structure and can be a useful way to approach teaching in some situations because it recognizes the complexity and individuality of the learner and utilizes individuality to make the learning process much more effective. Constructivist ideas can be found abundantly in homeschooling, where they work quite well, although there are situations where it can be very useful in a classroom setting.

But Freire was a Marxist (he helped found the Labor Party in Brazil), and his view of constructivism was Marxist. He promulgated the idea that two people do not have more or less knowledge about something relative to one another because that would be inequality. Because he did not acknowledge the hierarchy of the classroom whatsoever, he disregarded any authority the teacher had and insisted that both teachers and students are on a level plane of knowledge on which they must build and learn from each other. 

To him, one did not have more or less knowledge in relation to another, one only had different knowledge. This idea is absurd, and it incentivizes the students to disregard their own ignorance about a subject, but, unfortunately, it has crept into every school in the land.

Brazil is in an educational rut, caused in part by the Marxist ideology that purveys the system. Every year, the mechanism regurgitates more indoctrinated and unprepared students, who, while not always ending up working to keep or maintain the current broken system, will at least be indifferent to the problems and just go along with the flow. The future is grim, but not without hope, and I do hope one day Brazil will have the educational system it needs and deserves, free from Marxist indoctrination. 

I also hope America takes heed to not go down the route we have in Brazil.

Nathan Neuman is a high school senior, an avid reader, and a semi-professional violinist currently living in Natal, Brazil. He is passionate about his Christian faith and Conservatism and hopes to spread those values through a career in music or political journalism. When not busy with academics or practicing the violin, he enjoys serving at church, watching Flamengo soccer games, as well as listening to Rachmaninov’s second piano concerto.

The views expressed in this article are the opinion of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Lone Conservative staff.


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About Nathan Neuman

Nathan Neuman is a high school senior, an avid reader, and a semi-professional violinist currently living in Natal, Brazil. He is passionate about his Christian faith and Conservatism and hopes to spread those values through a career in music or political journalism. When not busy with academics or practicing the violin, he enjoys serving at church, watching Flamengo soccer games, as well as listening to Rachmaninov’s second piano concerto.

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