The 2020 Election and the Loss of “Wokeness”

by

Monday, November 9, 2020


On November 7, 2020 Joe Biden was declared the 46th President of the United States. President Donald Trump and President-elect Joe Biden fought a neck-to-neck battle in several states. However, one thing is clear: the woke left has failed its mission. 

Before vote-counting began on November 3, Democrats were expected to make gains in the House and to flip the Senate too from Red to Blue. In fact, Sussan Collins, a moderate Republican Senator, was trailing opponent Sara Gideon in every single poll. Senator Collins won Maine by 9%. In the House, Republicans were expected to flip at least eight seats, leading to a net gain of five. Much of the new GOP class is composed of women and minorities and Republicans can easily win back the House in 2022, given new redistricting plans by the local legislators.

A Biden Administration could likely bring back some Obama-era policies such as re-entering the Paris Accord or the Iran-Nuclear deal. President Biden has the potential to issue executive orders on issues such as gun control and immigration. However, this is far from what the woke section of the Democratic Party could have hoped for. 

Republicans are likely to keep both Senate seats in Georgia, causing a net loss of 1, thus stalling Biden’s proposed tax plan as well as leftist judicial and Cabinet nominees. 

However, the biggest loser of the 2020 election was “wokeness.” The idea of wokeness can be thought of as “alert to racial or social discrimination and injustice.” 

Of course it is important to call out instances of social discrimination and injustice; however, the “woke” have taken this a step further. The woke left often engages in the concept of identity politics, whereby one’s immutable characteristics such as race, gender and sexual orientation ought to define their political views. For instance, the woke left often claims that women, minorities and LGBTQIA+ individuals “vote against their own interests” when they vote for Republican candidates. 

The only group Trump fell short with in 2016 was white men. For instance, Joe Biden noted that black people that do not vote for him “ain’t Black.” Trump made gains with African Americans, Hispanics, women and even with members of the LGBTQIA+ community. 

The left hoped that emphasizing policies like easier access to abortion would attract more women to their cause and away from the GOP. It did not. For instance, in my case, the economic policies put forward by the GOP are what drove me to vote for Republican candidates, now and in the past. Being told that I shouldn’t be voting Republican because I am a woman drove me away from the Democrats. 

A lot of these ideas are often portrayed by the media, celebrities, and higher education institutions. For instance, the New York Times 1619 Project (which states the Founding of the United States should not be traced to 1776 but rather to the year the first slaves arrived) won a Pulitzer Prize. A number of celebrities supported the “Defund the Police” movement while also donating to causes that help bail out individuals arrested during riots (not just protests) taking place during the BLM movement. Finally, institutions such as my Alma Mater, Boston University, adopted Ibrahim X Kendi’s “Center for Antiracist Research.” Most recently, Kendi accused now-Justice Amy Coney Barrett of being a “white colonizer” who used her black (adopted) children as “props.” 

Even though many on the left believe this to be the case and how the majority of Americans think, it is not. Fortunately, the majority of the American electorate rejected such ideas. Conservatives should cherish the result of this month’s election. Of course, President Trump’s loss is an unideal outcome for many conservatives; however, it is very likely that voters were ticked off by Trump’s rhetoric, not his policies. 

If Republicans continue to focus on the issues that matter to Americans, the best is yet to come. 

 

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Anastasia is a MSc candidate in Democracy and Comparative Politics at the University College London (UCL) in the United Kingdom. Born and raised in Athens, Greece, to American parents, Anastasia has also lived in the United States and in France. During her free time, she enjoys traveling the world and spending time with her two dogs, Jasper and Charlie.

The views expressed in this article are the opinion of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Lone Conservative staff.


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About Anastasia Kourtis

Anastasia is a MSc candidate in Democracy and Comparative Politics at the University College London (UCL) in the United Kingdom. Born and raised in Athens, Greece, to American parents, Anastasia has also lived in the United States and in France. During her free time, she enjoys traveling the world and spending time with her two dogs, Jasper and Charlie.

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