Billie Eilish & The Milgram Experiment: The Negative Effects of Celebrity Activism

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Tuesday, September 29, 2020


Ah celebrities, they play a massive role in our society and we cherish them for their entertainment. We enjoy their music, cheer them on at sports events, and eagerly watch their movies. However, it can be extremely frustrating when they preach about political issues—especially when they are also deceitful about it!

Recently, a flood of celebrities have been virtue signaling all over social media. Two notable examples are Billie Eilish and Taylor Swift, who both launched an attack on President Trump.

Today, let’s look at some of the negative effects that these celebrities have when they start preaching on political issues, specifically regarding their impact on the younger generation. 

Celebrities have extensive social media followings. Billie Eilish has 65 million Instagram followers and Taylor Swift has 86 million Twitter followers, many of whom are young people. 

Many older conservatives who are attuned to the political climate will just roll their eyes and move on in life. A lot of teenagers though don’t bother to keep up with politics. As a result, their only political exposure is from mainstream celebrities who often spread “leftist messages” that influence young people to hold leftist views. 

Billie Eilish is a perfect example of this.

Eilish shared a thread of Instagram stories utterly denouncing President Trump.  However, she took some of Trump’s tweets out of context and mischaracterized them. 

She shared a screenshot of a tweet which referred to the VIOLENT George Floyd rioters as “thugs” and a second tweet which referred to the PEACEFUL lockdown protesters as “good people.” Eilish, however, presented these tweets through the lens of race. She said that Trump referred to BLACK protesters as “thugs” and WHITE protesters as “good people.”

A lot of young people who only viewed Eilish’s commentary of the tweets will believe her mischaracterization and view Trump the same way she doesas a racist. It’s sad.

Now a lot of celebrities have, in particular, been virtue signalling about racism. Many posted black squares to their Instagram feed and posted content about Black Lives Matter. These sorts of actions quickly become trends. People can very easily reshare a post that a celebrity has shared. Following their example, they think it is “cool” and “trendy” to change their profile picture to black or put “Black Lives Matter” in their Instagram bio. 

Of course, some students genuinely care about the cause, however, a lot of people will just copy these actions because celebrities are doing them. 

Students admire celebrities; they aspire to be like them and, if a celebrity they admire holds a certain view or shares something on social media, many students will imitate them. 

This is foolishmaybe even dangerous. 

The Milgram experiment showed how many people will simply obey someone they consider an “authority figure.”

The participants believed they were involved in a teaching experiment, but they were actually test subjects in a study on authority. The subjects were told they had to “teach” another participant, an actor, by delivering an electric shock of increasing intensity with every incorrect answer.

There were 30 switches on the shock generator marked from 15 volts (slight shock) to 450 (danger – severe shock). No shocks were actually given and the experiment was testing to see if these participants would give these incredibly painful shocks simply because a “scientist” in a white lab coat told them to do so. To make it more realistic, the experimenters played recordings of screams which also led the participant to believe they were inflicting severe pain. When the participant refused to administer a shock, the experimenter would give a series of orders/prods to ensure they continued.

There were four prods and, if one was not obeyed, the next prod was read out, and so on…

Prod 1: Please continue.

Prod 2: The experiment requires you to continue.

Prod 3: It is absolutely essential that you continue.

Prod 4: You have no other choice but to continue.

The results showed that 65% of the participants continued to the highest level of 450 volts. All the participants continued to at least 300 volts.

This experiment shows how humans go to extreme lengths to obey authority. If ordinary humans are capable of delivering 450-volt shocks because someone in a lab coat told them to, it is no surprise that people will vote how a celebrity tells them to.

What can you do? 

First, challenge your friends. If you see a friend share a celebrity’s post or other opiniongently share your opinion to get them thinking.

Second, encourage your friends to explore other viewpoints and further research political issues. For example, get them to subscribe to Lone Conservative so they can hear conservative opinions from other people their age!

 

Photo Credit

Alisa is a 9th grade homeschooled student from Australia! She is passionate about getting young people involved with the conservative movement and enjoys making video content and writing articles expressing her thoughts. When she's not doing political work, Alisa enjoys dancing and spending time with her friends and family.

The views expressed in this article are the opinion of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Lone Conservative staff.


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About Alisa Jae

Alisa is a 9th grade homeschooled student from Australia! She is passionate about getting young people involved with the conservative movement and enjoys making video content and writing articles expressing her thoughts. When she's not doing political work, Alisa enjoys dancing and spending time with her friends and family.

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