Serena Dyksen: Finding God’s Grace After an Abortion

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Monday, August 10, 2020


When she was just 13, Serena Dyksen endured a traumatic abortion after becoming pregnant through a rape. The man who performed her abortion was none other than Ulrich Klopfer, the Indiana abortionist who stored the remains of more than 2,000 aborted children in his home and garage. Describing her experience as a “total God journey,” Dyksen found healing through His unending mercy. She now offers comfort to other post-abortive women through “She Found His Grace,” an abortion healing ministry Dyksen founded that shares a name with her upcoming memoir

“In counseling, I talked about my rape, but I never talked about abortion,” Dyksen explained in an interview with Lone Conservative. “…Then a friend invited me to watch the movie Unplanned…it was like my life was unfolding before my eyes, and the Holy Spirit was like: Tell the rest of your story.” 

Dyksen eventually reached out to her local Right to Life, and, after sharing her story, she began training to counsel women on the sidewalk outside abortion clinics. After being encouraged to seek post-abortive healing during training, Dyksen realized what had been laid on her heart. She began planning a memorial service to help mothers and fathers wounded by abortion. 

“…The night before the memorial service was when the story broke about Klopfer,” Dyksen recalled. “…I went to bed and I just started crying, calling out for the Lord. I was like, ‘Was my baby one of them?’” 

“Then I heard the Holy Spirit say, ‘Your baby, and all of the babies are with me. Why do you think I asked you to share your story?’” 

Many women began reaching out to Dyksen after hearing about her on the news. For some women, Klopfer had also been their abortionist. But for others, just hearing about Klopfer’s deeds was triggering, and they needed to pour their hearts out to someone. Dyksen has remained in contact with several of these women, which she says is “awesome.” 

“I’m thankful for the healing process and how the Lord prepared me, but so many of these women were turned so sideways,” Dyksen said. “So many women who reached out decided it was time for them to seek healing. It’s been reeling to see God open the door and work in those ways.”

Dyksen has witnessed the transforming power of God firsthand. Following her abortion, Dysken faced many trials, such as family hardships, teen pregnancy, health problems, and drug and alcohol abuse. When Dyksen later suffered a miscarriage at 25, she did not know why it felt like a “deep grief on top of grief.” Dyksen didn’t have many opportunities to discuss with others how her abortion affected her, and she attributed this to how young she was when it happened.

“To be honest, since I was so young, I didn’t understand what abortion was,” Dyksen admitted. “When I did, I think it impacted me deeply. It impacts women deeply anyway, but for me, it was the shock of taking a human life. That was a very, very deep wound for me, so I didn’t want to talk about that.” 

But one night, years after the abortion, God met Dyksen in her time of need and “lavished [her] in love.” 

“That’s when I found God’s grace and His love,” Dyksen said. “It was being at the bottom of the pit and crying out to Him and saying that I needed help.” 

 “God takes our pain and turns it into purpose…We know that God is a healer, a redeemer, and a restorer,” she continued. “He offers us this love and mercy, even when we’re running…Even in my running, He was still there. He was just waiting on me to say I needed Him. And He was like, ‘I’m here.’” 

A sense of completeness filled Dyksen after she attended a post-abortive retreat. Before, Dyksen used to tell people she had only two children. Being allowed to mourn is what helped Dyksen process the children she had lost through miscarriage and abortion.   

“When women have an abortion, they don’t grieve,” Dyksen noticed. “I think a lot of post-abortive women feel they can’t grieve, like they don’t deserve to. So when they go through post-abortive healing, and they’re given the opportunity to grieve for their child, it’s a very beautiful thing that happens.” 

“A common thing I hear all the time is, ‘Well, that’s your story,’” Dyksen elaborated. “‘You can’t put your story on other people.’ And that’s fine. For every one of those women who are saying that, there’s women who will see it and reach out to say, ‘I’m struggling, too.’” 

Dyksen’s ministry for women has continued to grow beyond what she ever imagined it would. She hopes by finally publishing her story, the Lord will use it as a “healing tool for women.”

Samantha Kamman is a conservative and a graduate of North Central College. Having pursued a degree in theatre and English studies, she has a lot to write about and is looking for ways to get published. Samantha is incredibly grateful to the staff of The Lone Conservative for considering her work.

The views expressed in this article are the opinion of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Lone Conservative staff.


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About Samantha Kamman

North Central College

Samantha Kamman is a conservative and a graduate of North Central College. Having pursued a degree in theatre and English studies, she has a lot to write about and is looking for ways to get published. Samantha is incredibly grateful to the staff of The Lone Conservative for considering her work.

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