Lexi’s Life Advice: Politics and Friendships

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Friday, July 3, 2020


I am excited to start Lone Conservative’s first column series that answers questions from our supporters and followers. Every Monday, Lone Conservative will post on either Twitter or Instagram so you can submit your questions that you want answered. It can range from issues on campus to general life struggles. 

After growing up in a small town, I decided to attend Penn State Altoona and major in political science. I am certainly not an expert on any topic, but great advice doesn’t have to come from some far-away expert. Often, the best advice comes from those struggling through the same thing. I’ll also get a little help from other members at Lone Conservative, who do have some expertise. Enough about me, let’s get to the questions you guys submitted on our Instagram this past Monday.

Asher What sources should I use to cement my conservative beliefs?

You should use sources from all over the political spectrum to cement your conservative beliefs. Think tanks like the Heritage Foundation are a great place for solid information, and a good liberal think tank is the Center for American Progress. Read books that your favorite political commentators recommend. For example, if Jonah Goldberg recommends Edmund Burke, read some of his work. I would also read political philosophers from across the spectrum: the founding fathers, Karl Marx, Alexis de Tocqueville, and more to become more established in your beliefs.

Daniel Any relationship advice for a guy?

Don’t waste time going on a date with someone who has vastly different core beliefs than you. Obviously, there are policy issues that aren’t particularly consequential, but if you have different fundamental beliefs from another person, there is no point in wasting either person’s time. Besides that, be confident enough to make the first move but patient enough to know that it might take some girls longer to want to go on a date or be open with you.

AlisaHow to talk with friends that can’t really argue logically but are politically involved?

There are people who argue based on emotions who are still willing to listen and hear the other side. If it is that type of person, take the emotional sides of your arguments and use that first before introducing any facts. The person will then be more willing to hear the facts. If the person isn’t willing to listen and is just rude, I would let them go for the most part. Even if they are politically involved, you won’t be able to change their mind. Focus on the others in your group who are willing to hear you out. As they hear you out, you get to hear them out. Sometimes the other side does have facts that we don’t want to hear and we can get just as emotional as them. Talk to open-minded people and be open-minded.

Anonymous Will Republicans take the House, Senate, and Presidency?

No. That rarely happens when there is a normal presidency, let alone a Trump presidency. My advice is to focus on the presidency and the Senate. Republicans need to be reaching out to younger and more diverse voters. We need a message of unity and not division if we want any chance of winning the House, Senate, or Presidency.

Juliet How to talk to close liberal friends about conservatives without hurting friendships?

I am going to assume if they are a close friend they know your political stance already. You kind of need to walk on eggshells when you first begin the conversation. If your friend says something that is just wrong about conservatives, my first response would be “I understand that there are a few that could think that way, but that isn’t how most conservatives feel.” That will lead them to ask you what you mean so you get a chance to explain. Just be kind and respectful when bringing up differences. If they don’t respect that, they aren’t a close friend. Similarly, you must be willing to hear them out and be respectful or else you aren’t a good friend.

These are all the questions that I can answer this week. Thank you to everyone who submitted questions. If your question wasn’t answered, don’t worry, you still have a chance to get it featured in next week’s column! Or you could resubmit your question on Monday on our Twitter when we post about it. You can check back next Friday to see if it has been answered. Hope this advice was helpful and I’ll see you guys next week.

Lexi Lonas is a student reporter with The College Fix and a columnist for Lone Conservative. This summer she will be interning with The Washington Examiner and be a Fellow for Heritage’s program, The Academy. Previously, Lexi has interned at The Daily Caller and her work has also been seen in The Daily Signal. She will be graduating this fall from Penn State Altoona.

The views expressed in this article are the opinion of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Lone Conservative staff.


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About Lexi Lonas

Pennsylvania State University of Altoona

Lexi Lonas is a student reporter with The College Fix and a columnist for Lone Conservative. This summer she will be interning with The Washington Examiner and be a Fellow for Heritage’s program, The Academy. Previously, Lexi has interned at The Daily Caller and her work has also been seen in The Daily Signal. She will be graduating this fall from Penn State Altoona.

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