MANN: Now’s a Good Time to Reach Out

by

Friday, June 12, 2020


The first half of 2020 has been the most tumultuous period that I can remember. Few times do I ever recall collective hopelessness weigh as heavy as it now does. The yoke of negativity that our headlines create drags each of our societal outlooks further into the dirt.

The first contender bent on crippling the planet arrived as a novel virus. The result was nationwide lockdowns and six-figure death tolls. Stay-at-Home orders confined millions to their homes for fear of viral contraction, or worse unknowingly spreading it to others. The orders started as a Bandaid, but as good news dwindled so too did the hope of reopening. 

Weeks passed from March through April and we maintained the rules of our new society: only travel for essentials, no interstate commerce, businesses closed, gatherings nonexistent. We watched as jobs and small businesses alike were engulfed into the void of an irresistible virus followed by bureaucratic domination. Our phones and TVs, once a distraction from the real world, became the last remaining gateway outside our walls. Then the riots began.

Like a dog backed into a corner, society lashed out at those who enforced our situation. Cities caught fire, stores were looted, and the messages intended by the peaceful protestors against police violence and racial injustice were drowned out by those who cared for neither. Molotov cocktails quickly erased what the property of business owners still held. 

On the back of the protests arose our final (as of yet) challenger—the canceling. A lot of people voiced their opinions on the current situation—many of which were bad. In fact, they continue as of early June. Intuitively, the worse the take, the higher the vitriol with which it is met. Cancellations have come in at a rate of one notable name per hour. Celebrities have had to apologize, not only for their own opinions but also that of their families. Aleksandar Katai, Paw Patrol, Live PD, all victims of the torch-bearing Twitter mob.

It is okay to be sad about the current state of society. It is likely that we are all in the same gloomy boat. While I am unable to give solutions to the problems the country is facing, I can advise personal action. Reach out to your friends and loved ones. They are witnessing the same debacle as you are. A simple, “How are you doing,” can positively affect a person’s entire day. 

It is important that we reconvene periodically to monitor our own personal well-being. So too should that consideration be given to those you care about. While this banal act is surely welcomed at any time outside of global chaos, it is particularly potent now. We are in a time of heightened negativity and elevated hate. Our effort to assure loved ones of our emotional availability should match that in magnitude. 

The virus will subside and the societal anger will fizzle. The Internet will shortly reach another happening to which they can turn their crosshairs. However, the feelings of your loved ones are not so quickly pivoted. The efforts you exert now to solidify those relationships can pay dividends in emotional contentment in the long term. 

Tanner is a born-and-raised West Virginian. He has a Bachelor's Degree in Mathematics from West Virginia University and currently works as an Actuary. His interests include politics, physical fitness, professional soccer, and corgis.

The views expressed in this article are the opinion of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Lone Conservative staff.


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About Tanner Mann

West Virginia University

Tanner is a born-and-raised West Virginian. He has a Bachelor's Degree in Mathematics from West Virginia University and currently works as an Actuary. His interests include politics, physical fitness, professional soccer, and corgis.

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