Homeschooling Provides The Individualism This Generation Needs

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020


With the advent of the newest global pandemic, schools across the nation are shutting down in order to observe government-provided social distancing guidelines, in favor of holding classes online with the help of programs such as Zoom and Canvas.

Despite the widespread usage of these programs in high schools and universities before the coronavirus became a worldwide affair, outlets like the Washington Post have attacked the implementation of online schooling severely, stating in one headline, “Homeschooling during the coronavirus will set back a generation of children.”

The author cites several articles from The 74 project, a non-profit news outlet dedicated to giving America’s youth “the education they deserve.” In one piece, studies from the Center for Research on Education Outcomes, the Center for Reinventing Public Education, and Mathematica Policy Research are linked, and all statistically show that the academic impact of online schools on students is significantly worse than the impact of traditional public schools. In other words, students attending online schools aren’t learning and retaining “enough” information, at least according to the math of these institutions. The Center for Research on Education Outcomes, or CREDO, estimates the academic growth of students by comparing online students to public school students. 

This method, according to The 74, is debated in the field because researchers “match students attending online charters to demographically similar students…who attend “feeder” traditional public schools and have similar prior levels of achievement.”

Regardless of whatever standard is used, comparing homeschool education to public education is fundamentally dangerous. At least 100 different curriculums exist, and they exist because no one student is the same when it comes to education. Every student has a unique learning style and a unique method of retaining information, making comparison between students in academic achievement close to impossible. Also, homeschooled students do tend to score a number of points higher than public students on the SAT and the ACT.

Despite this, homeschooling, frankly, is not a measurable medium of education. Academic achievement is simply not calculable through standardized tests in the way public education is. Rather, homeschooling is beneficial to students through its qualities.

One of homeschooling’s most appealing qualities is freedom. Freedom to make their own schedules and manage their own time, freedom to learn at their own pace and truly understand the material, and freedom to spend time on the things they enjoy. Public school doesn’t allow for these freedoms; restricting students to a specific schedule, compressing months of material into weeks of instruction, and confining students to just 2 days where they can spend time on their hobbies and personal interests. 

As with anything requiring an effort from both parties, homeschooling can go wrong. If a parent isn’t attentive to his/her child’s specific learning needs and doesn’t tailor material to those needs, that child won’t learn. Some parents may rarely attempt to falsify their child’s education, in which case the child still won’t get the education they need. Whatever the case may be, these scenarios are certainly not the norm. 

Parents typically choose to homeschool their children, among other reasons, in order to give them a richer, more well-rounded education. Whereas public education constricts students to a path beaten by instruction and indoctrination, homeschooling lets students learn at their own pace, and develop their own beliefs, giving them a unique individualism that, in light of current events, this generation will certainly need.

Jack Cowhick is a sophomore at The Colony High School, a member of his school's debate team, and an active member of his church. He plans on attending the University of Texas at Austin for political science. When not writing about politics, Jack enjoys writing jokes, reading about history, and serving at his church on the broadcast team.

The views expressed in this article are the opinion of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Lone Conservative staff.


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About Jack Cowhick

Jack Cowhick is a sophomore at The Colony High School, a member of his school's debate team, and an active member of his church. He plans on attending the University of Texas at Austin for political science. When not writing about politics, Jack enjoys writing jokes, reading about history, and serving at his church on the broadcast team.

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