A Conversation with Hunter Pollack

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Thursday, November 14, 2019


Q: So can you give us a little bit of background about yourself for those of us who don’t know? 

A: Yeah, My name is Hunter Pollack. I am 22 years old [and] am a student at Florida State University. I lost my sister Meadow Pollack in the Parkland shooting last February in 2018. Since then I’ve been interning with Senator Rick Scott, working with Governor Ron DeSantis and [Florida’s former] Attorney General, the great Pam Bondi.  

 

Q: You’ve said in the past that the root cause of mass shootings which plague our country is the massive gap in mental health awareness. Do you think that the solution falls in the responsibility of the people or our elected officials to remedy such?   

A: To tell you the truth, I’ve been so active for the past 19 months, and I’ve met with a lot of politicians in that time. It seems like when you meet with politicians, they don’t really want to make a positive change; they just want to use a Parkland victim’s family for a photo op. I think as society we need to do individual work and come together to solve this problem. I think we need to reach out to our friends who are hurting. I think we need to be more empathetic and generally aware of other people.  Protect yourself at all costs, be that getting a concealed carry license or avoiding gun free zones so that you aren’t a sitting duck. 

 

Q: Do you also think that our social fabric has in some way been torn by these tragedies? Obviously, after a massive tragedy occurs, the community mourns and subsequently comes together, but once the initial impact dies down, do you feel that humankind loses its connectivity? 

A: You know, when this mass shooting happened, my family said, ‘We don’t care if you’re Republican or Democrat, we want to keep your child safe: we’re the human party.’  As time went on, we then saw that it wasn’t realistic, it wasn’t pragmatic. We’re so polarized nowadays it’s almost impossible to work together. As we went on, my family started aligning ourselves with the conservative movement, since they were the ones to propose more common-sense solutions to protect Florida students.  

 

Q: Now recently you’ve been vocal about legalizing campus carry. How do you think a measure like this would affect say our campus, as a whole? 

A: I don’t think it would negatively affect our campus; I think it could only be positive. If you look at the classroom, we sit with forty young adults in a classroom with open doors and no officers nearby, yet I can’t bring my legal, concealed firearm to class because student policy and legislation says that I can’t. Police officers, on average, take 5-10 minutes to respond to emergency events and, where seconds matter, having a concealed carry license would allow you to protect yourself within those seconds… It’s imperative that we be proactive rather than reactive about these situations. We’ve been reactive and that’s not the way we can do things anymore. 

 

Q: In terms of hot button issues, red flag laws have been thrown around as a hypothetical solution. What thoughts do you have on the subject? 

A: I’d pass red flag laws in the state of Florida. They’ve done great work to take guns away from people who were deemed mentally unfit, but–and I’ll kind of contradict myself here-I also think red flag laws could be unconstitutional based on who is enforcing it. I think we need something like red flag laws, but we [need] to ensure that they’re constitutional and that there is no way that innocent people could have their guns taken away…I’m still fifty-fifty, but I think that it could be helpful if implemented in the right way 

 

 Q: Can you give advice to college students or even high school students who may want to step out into activism soon? Most conservative students fear the attacks and the social stigma on campus, but did you face any obstacles which one wouldn’t necessarily expect? 

A: Of course, I’ve faced obstacles. People slandered my name, they said things that aren’t true about my character, but the reason why I keep moving forward is because I know I’m doing the right thing. I don’t care about the opinions of other people. That’s my advice to those who want to jump into [the] world of activism: be fierce, be confident, put faith into what you’re saying and don’t worry about the opinions of other people. If you let the opinions of other people consume your mind, you’re not going to be productive. If you want to be productive, be confident and don’t worry about the opinions of others.

Taylor Walker is a sophomore at Florida State University studying Political Science and Communications. From working on SGA executive projects to managing student campaigns, Taylor is known for promoting success on campus. When not found stressing out in a library study room, she can be found watching conspiracy theory documentaries, petting every dog she sees on the campus green, and rolling her eyes at state congressmen in committee meetings.

The views expressed in this article are the opinion of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Lone Conservative staff.


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About Taylor Walker

Taylor Walker is a sophomore at Florida State University studying Political Science and Communications. From working on SGA executive projects to managing student campaigns, Taylor is known for promoting success on campus. When not found stressing out in a library study room, she can be found watching conspiracy theory documentaries, petting every dog she sees on the campus green, and rolling her eyes at state congressmen in committee meetings.

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