BUCK: What Feminists Don’t Get About Bill Burr

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Monday, September 30, 2019


Last week, I overheard a conversation about a man who listens to Bill Burr to fall asleep. To anyone who has heard the comedian without understanding him, that seems borderline oxymoronic; he’s known for his bombastic presence. However, underneath the surface, he provides catharsis in an age when men are told that they aren’t allowed to feel.

When he whines into the mic “what’re you, a fag?” those who misunderstand the comic only hear him yell that final word. The following two minutes and twenty seconds that he takes to contextualize it are blocked out. One critic referred to his comedy as “ mostly just hostile expressions of aggrievement.”

The thing is, though, he speaks about real aggrievement. Beginning with the aforementioned bit, he turns this crass exclamation into the subconscious reality of many modern men. They’re unable to “say a puppy is cute” or “admit that they want a cookie” because a lifetime of social pressure has told them that it is weak to do so.

He suggests that this is the reason men drop dead at 50, which while humorous, reflects reality. Men commit suicide at a rate 3.5 times higher than women. Blame it on their method of suicide or not—men tend to use a gun, a fail-safe method, while women lean towards less-effective methods—the statistic stands. Men are suffering.

Beyond just his insightful jokes, Bill Burr also plays a character on stage. He embodies everything that the left would label ‘toxic masculinity.’ He’s aggressive, angry, entitled, arrogant, misogynistic; the list goes on. When this character then expresses the lunacy over his perceived need to repress his emotions, it becomes acceptable to others.

Modern motifs aren’t helping this trend. Andrew Sullivan wrote a challenging piece for Intelligencer in which he criticizes the effect that modern racial discussions might have on adolescents. He writes, “children, in other words, are being taught to think constantly about race, and to feel guilty if they are the wrong one.” While Bill Burr focuses more on gender, the same analysis applies here. There’s a psychological consequence to telling half the population that their gender is at fault for societal ills.

This isn’t to say that Burr is some champion of incels, suggesting that men are some lone, suffering group. He brings up similar troubles for other demographics: police violence, sexual assault, and other such horrors. He just doesn’t leave men out of the conversation and that’s why so many find him not just amusing but cathartic.

Alum of the University Wisconsin - Madison, Daniel studied English and Spanish as an undergraduate, later to receive a masters in education. He works as a teacher in a diverse school and hopes to show how conservatism presents a viable solution to the disparity and impoverishment that the left decries.

The views expressed in this article are the opinion of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Lone Conservative staff.


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About Daniel Buck

Alum of the University Wisconsin - Madison, Daniel studied English and Spanish as an undergraduate, later to receive a masters in education. He works as a teacher in a diverse school and hopes to show how conservatism presents a viable solution to the disparity and impoverishment that the left decries.

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