LONAS: Don’t Have A Midterm Crisis

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Wednesday, September 25, 2019


It seems like school started yesterday, but midterms are right around the corner. Not something to take lightly, midterms count for a good percentage of a grade. A friend of mine had to drop out of a class after failing just a midterm. However, this exam doesn’t have to be as stressful as it seems. Here are some tips to avoid the panic that comes with midterms.

1. Take Good Notes

This advice might seem obvious, but many students mess this up. They pull random loose-leaf paper out and then shove it into their bag haphazardly afterward or take notes in different notebooks and so can’t figure out where anything is. Instead, I take sloppy notes in class and then organize them later. This practice ensures you have all the content the professor covered easily accessible and ready for review.

2. Ask Questions Now

If you are confused about anything in class, don’t wait until the last minute to ask the professor. Around midterms, professors are flooded with requests from students and so instructors won’t have time to respond to everyone or won’t give an in-depth explanation if they do. If you go to the professor now, you will not only get a good explanation but will develop a positive relationship with them and have one less thing to do later.

3. Notecards

Notecards are a great way to study for any exam as they are portable and so accessible anywhere, and you can remove whichever concepts you are confident in, thereby ridding yourself of some clutter. Whenever I had some time in between classes, I would take my notecards out and use that time to study.

4. Form A Study Group

Whenever you are alone trying to study, it is easy to get distracted or simply procrastinate. Scheduling a specific time to go meet with others to study will force you to actually do it. Another benefit is that your friends can help you with concepts you struggle with. Instead of being alone struggling to find an answer, you are able to ask questions and discuss the material. The difficulty, though, is finding a group that will study and not just have a social hour.

5. Start Studying Now

Don’t wait until the weekend before to cram half a semester of information. This is how students end up staying up till 4 am, not sleeping, and threatening to drop out of school. Now is the time to take good notes, ask questions, make notecards, and study with friends. The sooner you start doing this, the less you have to do before the exam. You will feel confident and be able to get a full 8 hours of sleep before the midterm. Save your future self some struggle and study now.

The norm is that before a big exam, college students should be stressed out, stay up late, and hardly eat because they are “working hard.” That shouldn’t be the norm and it doesn’t have to be like that. You can eliminate a lot of the stress by studying early and investing a little extra time in your education every day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alexandra Lonas is a student at The Pennsylvania State University of Altoona. She is a sophomore who is hoping to pursue a career as a political commentator. She is the president of the political science club and enjoys hiking, reading, and learning about other people's ideas.

The views expressed in this article are the opinion of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Lone Conservative staff.


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About Alexandra Lonas

Pennsylvania State University of Altoona

Alexandra Lonas is a student at The Pennsylvania State University of Altoona. She is a sophomore who is hoping to pursue a career as a political commentator. She is the president of the political science club and enjoys hiking, reading, and learning about other people's ideas.

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