Conservatives Must Fight for the Cities

by

Wednesday, June 12, 2019


America’s cities are bastions of liberalism. Frequently, Democratic politicians from Congressional districts based in cities run for reelection unopposed. In states that are dominated by cities, such as New York and California, it is virtually assured that they will send a Democrat to the Senate.

As the American population continues to urbanize, these problems will only be exacerbated, and we will see strong red states like Texas slowly move into the blue column. Conservatives have seemingly written off the cities as hopeless tasks, but this defeatism is inconsistent with conservative principles and, ultimately, will lead to the complete irrelevance of the conservative movement.

Conservatives frequently claim that conservative beliefs are universal and that they are the best cure for society’s ills. Despite this belief, conservatives refuse to deliver that cure to millions of their fellow citizens.

Arguably, it is the residents of these blue cities who need conservatism more than any other American, and yet the conservative movement sees these cities as mere opportunities for cheap talking points and memes on the left’s failure of government. If we sincerely believe that conservative beliefs are the solution to our nation’s problems, and if we sincerely care about our cities’ denizens rather than using them as a bludgeon against liberalism, then we must extend those solutions to all Americans especially those in our cities.

Beyond ideological consistency, a failure to invest in our cities would lead to the destruction of the conservative movement. The urban population already accounts for 82% of Americans, and, with an increasing level of urban sprawl, the cities will soon be able to dictate the direction the United States takes in its future.

If conservatives continue to surrender our cities to the left, then conservatives will continue to dig their own grave. Conservatives will be reduced to a handful of House districts, and hardly any more seats than that in the Senate. Conservatives wouldn’t even have the power to be an effective minority party, thus allowing the left to legislate with virtual impunity.

Therefore, if we believe that conservative principles are universal, and if we want to put those principles into practice, we must fight for our cities.

To do so is a daunting task. Victory will not be achieved within a single election cycle. Rather, we must recognize that it will require decades of effort and millions of dollars to achieve our goal. Furthermore, we must dedicate ourselves to wholly accomplishing this task. Pursuing the cities in fits and starts will only hinder our progress.

Flipping the cities from blue to red will largely rest on grassroots effort. We must listen to the particular issues and concerns affecting urban residents and then come up with conservative solutions tailored to their needs. We must be a presence in their lives, showing up at their doors and festivals and not merely on their TV.

Ethan Lucky is a student at Thomas Nelson Community College, where he is pursuing a degree in History and Secondary Education. When he's not debating politics or volunteering in his community, you can find him visiting the various museums and parks in his area.

The views expressed in this article are the opinion of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Lone Conservative staff.


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About Ethan Lucky

Thomas Nelson Community College

Ethan Lucky is a student at Thomas Nelson Community College, where he is pursuing a degree in History and Secondary Education. When he's not debating politics or volunteering in his community, you can find him visiting the various museums and parks in his area.

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