Review: Knock Down The House

by

Thursday, May 30, 2019


Scrolling through Netflix a few nights ago, I came across a documentary featuring everyone’s favorite congresswoman, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (AOC). Quickly realizing that this was the long awaited “AOC Documentary,” I got a snack from the kitchen and pressed play. However, just a few minutes into the production, I realized it wasn’t just an “AOC Documentary.”

Knock Down The House tells the story of four women from different parts of the country looking to bring an end to establishment Democrats who have taken advantage of their constituencies for years. While AOC is the main focus of the documentary, it is important to recognize the other woman also vying to become leaders of the future.

Cori Bush is a registered nurse in St. Louis, Missouri, who volunteered her services during the Ferguson protests and riots. Paula Jean Swearengin is the daughter of a coal miner. She challenged Senator Joe Manchin in West Virginia, securing over 30 percent of the vote in the Democratic primary. Amy Vilela is a mother from Nevada, who recently lost her daughter due to her medical insurance failing to cover major medical costs. After her daughter’s death, Vilela became a strong advocate for single-payer healthcare, in order to ensure people like her daughter don’t die due to lack of healthcare. These four women have great reasons to run for public office, and they each have one thing in common: they want everyday Americans to be represented in government by everyday Americans.

While the other three women had heart-touching stories for why they ran for office, Ocasio-Cortez was the only one who was successful in winning election. The documentary highlighted many aspects of AOC’s life during her candidacy: from her work as a bartender, to her late dad who inspired her to do great things, to the grassroots organizers who told her anything was possible. Much of the documentary gives the audience a perspective that can only be seen either from watching the documentary or working with grassroots organizations or campaigns.

There is currently a shift occurring in politics that can only truly be seen in the homes of everyday Americans. People are waking up to the fact that politicians no longer work for the people, but instead work for their own personal interests and the people that are funding them. Knock Down The House displays perfectly how, when people organize, they have the potential to defeat big political machines that consume communities for decades.

My favorite moment from the movie was when Ocasio-Cortez compared one of her campaign palm cards to a mailer being sent out by Congressman Crowley’s campaign. She pointed out that Crowley’s pamphlet missed two important things: a primary date and a platform. Ocasio-Cortez criticized Crowley and his campaign for sending a mailer that mentioned President Trump at least three times, and didn’t mention solutions for the Bronx and Queens at all.

This moment in the documentary made me realize Ocasio-Cortez may be a lot smarter than people think. While some Democrats may use Trump as a talking point for their campaigns, Ocasio-Cortez felt as if this was nothing but elitist talk that weakened the Democratic Party.

So, is Knock Down the House worth the watch? Absolutely.

Knock Down The House gives us an inside look on how campaign’s are really run, and how it may take a lot more than a nice name and a pretty face to win elections. While Ocasio-Cortez was the focus of the documentary, the film is about so much more. This documentary shows that absolutely anyone has the potential to achieve the American Dream.

No matter who you are, where you are from, and despite all the obstacles in your way, you have the potential to do the impossible. Take away the politics of AOC, and this is honestly a great documentary for anyone who aspires to be successful in politics.

 

Photo Credit

Jose Rodriguez, who also goes by “Francisco,” is a senior at John Jay College of Criminal Justice double majoring in Political Science and Economics. He has previously served as President of his College Republican chapter, along with being a staff member on a gubernatorial race in New York.

The views expressed in this article are the opinion of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Lone Conservative staff.


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About Jose Rodriguez

John Jay College

Jose Rodriguez, who also goes by “Francisco,” is a senior at John Jay College of Criminal Justice double majoring in Political Science and Economics. He has previously served as President of his College Republican chapter, along with being a staff member on a gubernatorial race in New York.

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