How to Win in 2020

by

Friday, May 3, 2019


After writing about the Democrats wanting to impeach Trump, and the various problems that the Democratic party will have to face in 2020, I want to end my series on the upcoming election by getting right to the central question on the minds of most Republicans: how do we go back to winning?

After being crushed in the House during the 2018 midterms around 31 seatsand narrowly holding on to the majority in the Senate, that central question hangs over the heads of the Republican Party like an ominous storm cloud. If they find the answer, Trump will win reelection and Republicans will stand a good chance at reclaiming the House while holding onto the Senate. But, if they fail to find that answer again, they could find themselves on the outside looking in as a new Democratic president and Congress swoop in to reverse all the positive policy of the last four years.

First and foremost, the Republican party needs to get better at messaging. Repeatedly during the 2018 midterms, they failed to make the case to key voting blocks that they were the better party, the party of economic security and personal freedom that has attracted many voters in the past. The Republicans managed to share that message with their rural base, but they failed miserably inside the suburbs. More than 80 suburban counties and cities voted more Democrat in 2018 than 2016, with 20 of those seeing double digit swings. Obviously, Republicans can’t win with such major centers of the population turning on them, and they can’t afford to do so in 2020, which brings me to my next point.

To target suburbs and to win back a lot of the voters that turned on the Republican party in 2018, Republicans must get better at attracting moderates back to the party. I don’t mean to beat a dead horse, but the moderates turned their backs on the Republican party in large numbers in 2018 and it cost them dearly. If the Republicans want to improve in 2020, and Trumps wants to win reelection, they will focus more on the moderates that got them there in 2016, instead of promoting the tough rhetoric that the base loves.

Finally, the focus must shift from Trump onto the Democrats for Trump to win. With a booming economy, solid unemployment numbers, and general sense of security, the Republicans have a lot going for them in 2020. The only downside is that, no matter how you feel about Trump, the polls point to him being an unpopular president despite all of the positive policy. An average approval rate of 39 percent is not an optimal approval rating for an incumbent seeking reelection, but the Republicans do have a fortunate out the insanity of the Democrats.

After a new wave of radical Democrats took office in 2019, they have been an unstoppable gaffe machine with no policy to show for it. Anti-Semitism, radical socialist economy policy ideas, and a brand new idea that the Boston Bomber should be allowed to vote are all part of the new Democratic party platformand it gives Trump an excellent line of attack.

By shifting the focus off of himself, and on to a crazy Democratic opponent, he can have a path to reelection by painting a clear choice for the American people.

In the end, the 2020 elections will be a sort of crossroads for America. Will we embrace radical socialist policies that could destroy our country forever or will the voters stick with the proven economic success that Republican policies can provide? A lot of this choice hinges on the Republican party, and how they will shape their messaging to draw this clearly for every voter in 2020.

If you want these crazy Democrats, vote for them, but, if you want solid economic policy with strong border security, vote for me. If the Republicans want to start their messaging off right, a message like that would be a great start.

Adam Burnett is currently attending Western Illinois University, seeking a major in Journalism with a minor in Political Science. Adam has future plans to be a political correspondent/columnist for a major newspaper, but wouldn’t rule out a career in politics.

The views expressed in this article are the opinion of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Lone Conservative staff.


Share This

About Adam Burnett

Western Illinois University

Adam Burnett is currently attending Western Illinois University, seeking a major in Journalism with a minor in Political Science. Adam has future plans to be a political correspondent/columnist for a major newspaper, but wouldn’t rule out a career in politics.

Looking to Submit an Article?

We always are happy to receive submissions from new and returning authors. If you're a conservative student with a story to tell, let us know!

Join the Team

Want to Read More?

From college experiences to political theory to sports and more, our authors have covered a wide assortment of topics tailored for millennials and students.

Browse the Archives