The Midnight Easter Egg Hunt

by

Saturday, April 20, 2019


When I was really young, my parents started the tradition of having an Easter egg hunt at our house. Now, being the Hunt (Yes, my last name really is Hunt) house, we don’t do anything normally. My parents decided that we’d have the Easter egg hunt at night. We live in the country, so we have a massive yard filled with trees, bushes and grass. My parents decided to use the lawns to host it an entire acre to hunt in.

The weeks leading up to the night, we would clean and stuff roughly 750 easter eggs. These would be filled with money, candy, and items relating to the resurrection of Jesus and the meaning of Easter. For the week leading up to the hunt, my mom would instruct the groundsmen not to cut certain areas of the lawn, so that it would be harder to find some of the eggs. The day would come and we would first hide the younger kids’ eggs. These eggs would be hidden on the ground in the tall grass, on tree stumps, and shrubs. The second level would be for children aged 8 and up these eggs would be at eye level for them. They would be hidden in trees, bushes, nooks, and crevices around the property. The older kids would have camo colored eggs to increase the difficulty level and would only find their eggs deep in bushes or high up in trees.

The eggs would be hidden so well that we would find them in leftover from the hunt in November. We would all hunt at the same time. Anywhere from 20-45 kids would be running around in the dark, tightly gripping flash lights, searching for the eggs. The hunt would last up to an hour.

Trying to find eggs in the light is easy but once you are forced to search with a flashlight, it gets intense.

Once all the eggs are found for the night, we all gather on the lawn and give out the larger prizes which can’t fit into the eggs. As kids trade candy and prizes, the parents sip coffee and catch up with friends.

This has been a tradition in the Hunt house for over 10 years and I’m sure it will continue to the next generation. Traditions like this are a great way to spend time with family and friends. It’s also a great time to invite new friends out to hunt and spread the meaning of Easter.

Happy Easter!

Taylor Hunt is a recent homeschool graduate and three-time recipient of the "American Citizenship Award." If she is not reading, she is probably drinking coffee, serving at church or playing board games with the family.

The views expressed in this article are the opinion of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Lone Conservative staff.


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About Taylor Hunt

Modesto Junior College

Taylor Hunt is a recent homeschool graduate and three-time recipient of the "American Citizenship Award." If she is not reading, she is probably drinking coffee, serving at church or playing board games with the family.

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