The Top Three Problems Christian Schools Cause

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Wednesday, February 13, 2019


Don’t teach kids how to fail

If there’s one thing Christians schools are good at, it’s mercy. In fact, teachers and faculty members are often forgiving to a fault. Christian schools are privately funded, which leaves room for parents who hope to never see their child fail.

“Well he was at a church retreat this weekend, so he didn’t get the chance to work on that assignment.”

This phrase, and many like it, can be all it takes for a teacher to let a student make up an assignment because it’s easier to do that than to argue the point with a parent paying thousands of dollars in tuition. However, giving in like this fails to teach students the one thing they need to learn as early as possible: failure is okay.

Failing teaches people how to adjust, how to grow, and how to prioritize. If a student knows they can get an extension on any assignment, there would be no point in doing the assignment on time in the first place. News flash: adult responsibilities don’t care how involved in church activities you are if you fail to do your job and complete tasks by the deadline.

A Christian school should be the place teaching you to how to catapult your failures into growth because, after all, the whole point of Christian education is to bring a stronger focus on God, and 2 Corinthians 12:9 says, “And He said to me,’My grace is sufficient for you, for power is perfected in weakness.’ Therefore, I will most gladly boast all the more about my weakness so that Christ’s power made reside in me.”

Makes scripture reading homework and undesirable

Bible classes are a fundamental part of Christian schools. This is not fundamentally a bad thing, but, when you turn reading and studying the Bible into homework assignments, it fosters the idea that scripture study is something a student has to do rather than encouraging students to build a deeper knowledge of the Bible.

Having Bible history classes as electives and offering chapel sessions to start the day are simple ways to engage students in the Bible without making theology a chore.

Increased focus on appearance

Most times, Christian schools require a uniform. At many schools, there are requirements for what kind jewelry and haircuts students can have. In fact, in my high school, cheap razors were kept in the teacher workrooms so that if any of the boys showed up with scruff, they were forced to shave at school.

Dress codes are one things, but when girls can get in trouble if their khakis don’t flare enough, and boys get sent home if their shorts are the wrong shade of khaki, there is something about that which implies a focus on appearance far exceeding the one Jesus holds. Jesus wants our best, loves us at our worst and desires that we love each other.

How can students be taught to love each other in spite of some mistakes (I’m not saying in ignorance of them) if at every turn they’re being threatened with punishment for wearing something the school deems unsatisfactory?

I remember more about uniform rules than most of the subjects I was taught in high school.

Jaime Hahn is a sophomore economics major at Kennesaw State University, where she is chair of her Young Americans for Freedom chapter. She is passionate about Whitesnake, Winston Churchill, and winning peers to the conservative movement.

The views expressed in this article are the opinion of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Lone Conservative staff.


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About Jaime Hahn

Kennesaw State University

Jaime Hahn is a sophomore economics major at Kennesaw State University, where she is chair of her Young Americans for Freedom chapter. She is passionate about Whitesnake, Winston Churchill, and winning peers to the conservative movement.

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