Surviving Law School as a Conservative

by

Wednesday, January 2, 2019


Attending a private, liberal arts college as an undergrad strengthened my conservative beliefs greatly and prepared me well for my transition to law school. Having been a law student for a couple months now, I have already learned a lot about how to survive and thrive while committed to conservative beliefs.

No, I have not seen “Legally Blonde.” However, I anticipated law school to be a fantastic setting for debate. This has been true, but only to a certain extent. Law school is a wonderful place to gather knowledge once you weave through all of the cheap shots at President Trump and Republicans. This shouldn’t be surprising— throughout the country, law school faculty are overwhelming liberal.

For whatever reason, this was not something I dealt with much as an undergrad. Law school lectures are rich and insightful; the Socratic method is terrifying; but there are subtle jabs at the President and the Republican party, even some that are less subtle.

But that is okay.

That is okay, because the discussions I have had with my classmates have given me faith in our society. Believe it or not, millennials agree on a lot of issues. There is an unstated caveat however, and it manifests itself when you identify as a conservative or a Republican.

Without such identifying labels, the barriers that prevent meaningful discussion are gone. But if you identify yourself as a conservative to a classmate in a general setting, expect to get that look— you know what I mean if you’ve gotten it before. It’s the look that automatically marks you as a Trump-loving, gun-toting, radical bigot, even if none of those apply.

But still, that is okay.

It’s okay, because being in law school makes for a great time, and today is a great time to be in law school. People who think like you do exist. The Federalist Society becomes your greatest strength. It is full of people who share views similar to most conservatives. That does not mean you only make friends within the confines of The Federalist Society, though. I have met some amazing people thus far, many of whom I have nothing in common with, politically.

Being in law school for a couple months has taught me that people have a lot more in common than what some would like to believe. Don’t get me wrong, there is still hostility over divisive issues, especially the Kavanaugh-Blasey Ford saga. It has been the talk of campus, culminating in the hearings involving the two.

There is an overall, one-direction consensus on issues like these, which makes it tough to speak out, but you get used to this as a conservative. It is understandable; this is a difficult issue to speak out on. At the same time, that should not stifle our opinions. But that’s the great thing about law school. There will be others who think like you do, and it’s not like you will be burned at the stake for being a conservative. People are going to be willing to listen to you, at least more than on social media.

Quite often, as millenials, we perceive the real world based off what we see and interact with on social media. In some ways it is an accurate representation, but, in many others, it is not. In real life, and in law school, you are going to find people who are willing to listen to you no matter how you differ politically. After all, these are the people who will be our future leaders, for better or for worse.

So don’t worry; law school isn’t like the horror show that is Twitter. You will find a group of people who think like you do and share common interests. You may have to sit through a few lectures that make you feel your beliefs are being questioned, but it’s okay. It makes your beliefs stronger and better-reasoned, not weaker.

This is better than undergrad. This is actually a place where you will find people with the same ideology, and, if you are lucky, you will find others who don’t agree with you, but are willing to listen.

Cody Maggard is a 2018 graduate of Lindsey Wilson College, where he majored in journalism, with minors in history and communication. He will begin law school in August at the University of Kentucky College of Law, where he plans to focus on Constitutional law. He is an advocate of conservative policy from a historical perspective and has an interest in both sports and politics.

The views expressed in this article are the opinion of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Lone Conservative staff.


Share This

About Cody Maggard

Lindsey Wilson College

Cody Maggard is a 2018 graduate of Lindsey Wilson College, where he majored in journalism, with minors in history and communication. He will begin law school in August at the University of Kentucky College of Law, where he plans to focus on Constitutional law. He is an advocate of conservative policy from a historical perspective and has an interest in both sports and politics.

Looking to Submit an Article?

We always are happy to receive submissions from new and returning authors. If you're a conservative student with a story to tell, let us know!

Join the Team

Want to Read More?

From college experiences to political theory to sports and more, our authors have covered a wide assortment of topics tailored for millennials and students.

Browse the Archives