Changing Your Behavior Can Help Prevent Sexual Assault Accusations

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Wednesday, October 17, 2018


In the wake of the sexual assault allegations against Justice Brett Kavanaugh, people interested in public office are now worried about the possibility of unsubstantiated or even false accusations. Putting aside political affiliation, Justice Kavanaugh’s reputation has been undeniably torn apart even with his confirmation to the Supreme Court. People are afraid of the same happening to them.

False accusations can destroy a person’s public image, cost them their career, and cause terrible legal ramifications. In the wake of #MeToo, it is pertinent to avoid any potentially ambiguous situations, so your name and reputation aren’t ruined, rightly or wrongly, later on.

If you take steps to avoid putting yourself in a situation where you can be accused of sexual assault, you will be able to save your career and other future job opportunities.

 

 

  • Encourage All Friends Who Are Sexually Assaulted to Report as Soon as Possible

 

Your reputation begins with a healthier cultural around sexual assault. If you know someone who has been sexually assaulted, let them know that you believe them and that they need to contact the authorities as soon as possible. If other people see someone come forward about being sexually assaulted, it could encourage other people to come forward about their experience.

People criticize the hostility, questions, and doubts with which some accusers are met. In a case 30 years old and lacking corroborating evidence, the waters can become understandably murky. However, as more credible accusations become more frequent, it will give encourage a more reasoned process of corroboration and give more credence to those who defend their own name.

 

  • Drink Responsibly

 

Alcohol will impair the judgement of both the accuser and the accused. It will impact the memories of what happened if the situation is called into question, and it will inhibit your own ability to read the fine nuance of social situations.

Remaining in control or having at least one person who has stayed sober can back up your story and keep you out of unnecessarily sticky situations. If you have a habit of becoming reckless, make sure that you do not put yourself in a situation that could result in genuinely making someone uncomfortable.

 

  • Learn How to Take a ‘No’

 

If you are out with friends and someone does not want you around, leave them alone. Leaving a situation at a bar or restaurant or party will avoid trouble after the night ends. This is once again where having friends with you will lend you credibility and good friends will pull you from bad decisions.

If men follow these steps when they are out in public, they will not find themselves in ambiguous situations that can lead to ambiguous allegations. Documenting where you were, who you were with, and just being a decent person will help save your job, career, and other future opportunities.

Matthew Edwards graduated from Illinois State University in December 2017 with a degree in political science and mass media. While he isn’t writing he is watching sports, going to concerts, and active in several church activities. He hopes to work for Fox News someday in production or as an on-air personality.

The views expressed in this article are the opinion of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Lone Conservative staff.


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About Matthew Edwards

Illinois State University

Matthew Edwards graduated from Illinois State University in December 2017 with a degree in political science and mass media. While he isn’t writing he is watching sports, going to concerts, and active in several church activities. He hopes to work for Fox News someday in production or as an on-air personality.

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