KLATSKY: Nikki Haley Is Right, It’s Time to Stop Owning the Libs

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Wednesday, July 25, 2018


On Monday, United Nations Ambassador Nikki Haley spoke in Washington D.C. at the Turning Point USA High School Leadership Summit. She asked people to raise their hands if they have ever “owned the Liberals” on Twitter. Almost everyone in the audience raised their hands, to which Haley responded:

And, of course, she is exactly right. It may be fun or enjoyable to piss off people on the other side of the aisle, but it does nothing to further conversation in our society.

We’ll never convince anyone by “triggering” people or by “owning” them. For example, when Lone Conservative’s founder, Kassy Dillon, recorded the infamous “Trigglypuff” video, she was just doing her job as a journalist.

Yes, it’s entertaining. Yes, it’s incredibly sad that people are so intolerant to hear other people speak. However, the internet trolls who attacked and threatened the woman online were just trying to “own the libs,” but looking for excuses to make people like her angrier is not an effective way to convince people that your ideas have merit.

Conservatives aren’t the only ones who are “owning” people either. You’ll recall just a few weeks ago when Democrats were up in arms and calling for the dissolution of the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).

So, Senate Republicans decided to allow a vote on a bill that would do just that. You’d think that, after weeks of Democrats tweeting “#AbolishICE” and “#KeepFamiliesTogether,” that they would vote for the bill.

How many Democrats voted for the Senate bill to abolish ICE, you might ask? Zero. Not one Democrat voted for it.

So do the Democrats actually want to abolish ICE? No — if they did, they would’ve voted for the bill. But they didn’t, because they were more concerned with “owning the cons.” The “abolish ICE” episode isn’t the only example of hysteria from leftists, either.

Last week, actor and director Mark Duplass was raked over the coals for daring to compliment conservative pundit Ben Shapiro, saying “He doesn’t bend the truth. [Ben’s] intentions are good.”

How dare Duplass compliment someone who disagrees with him, right? After he was attacked for saying something nice about Shapiro, he then tweeted out an apology.

Duplass was forced to apologize because he treated someone who he disagrees with a cordial amount of respect. The same type of situation arises with Antifa, a violent far-left group that physically assaults people who they disagree with. If you disagree with their mob, your ideas are seen as violence, so groups feel the need to retaliate with violence of their own.

All of these political tactics are beyond stupid. The entire goal of politics is revolved around the concept of people being able to discuss a given issue and how its results will affect society.

The idea that you can’t even treat someone with cordial respect if you disagree with them is dangerous. Cultural development and innovation revolve around people having mutual respect for one another, even when they don’t see eye to eye on a certain topic.

If we are at the point in American culture where we can’t even sit down to talk about something because it’s more important to anger the opposition, our society is lost.

Nikki Haley is right. Political discourse relies on people who are willing to talk and engage in civil discussions. Owning the libs and owning the cons is nonsensical. Instead, Americans should focus on having more enriching political conversations to make the world a better place.


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About Avery Klatsky

Avery Klatsky is a senior in high school in Plano, Texas. His interests include foreign policy, economics, free speech, the Second Amendment, and more.

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