Campaigning Made Me Love Politics Even More

by

Thursday, May 24, 2018


From as far back as I can remember, I’ve loved politics. I first knew I was a Republican when I was eight years old, but let’s fast forward ten years to my senior year of high school. This was about the time that all of my classmates began visiting universities to see which was the right one for us.

After doing research on every school in Michigan, I decided that, for at least a semester, Northern Michigan University was where I should be. After figuring out where I was going, I immediately looked up anything I could find on the College Republicans there since political activity was high on my priority list.

A few months later, I attended my first College Republicans meeting, excited to meet people like me. Just that one meeting led to more than I ever could have expected.

During the meeting, we discussed the 2017 Special Election in the 109th District of Michigan for Rich Rossway, a Republican candidate. I immediately jumped on the opportunity. A few other volunteers and I took off running- which really meant walking miles and knocking on doors for hours. For months I took any free time I had and worked on this campaign because I wanted to help “keep the U.P. red.”

Getting the word out to the community about this election was an indescribable feeling. Countless times I went up to houses that had no clue about the election or the candidates, and it was my job to inform them and encourage them to make the right decision when they voted. Even when I would meet some people that weren’t exactly rays of sunshine, I also met some that were surprisingly open-minded. Regardless of the person I met, each time they opened the door, I knew that I was spreading the word and helping allow even more people to get involved locally.

This campaign, along with College Republicans, also allowed me to meet incredibly hardworking politicians and amazing friends that I would never have met if I hadn’t gotten involved. We knocked on doors, went to conferences, town halls, speeches, and even worked at polling places on election day together. It was so wonderful knowing that I was working to change the world one community at a time alongside people with the same goal.

The most important thing I got out of working this campaign, however, was learning why getting involved in the community is important. Our candidate may not have won the election, but it made me realize how important it is to get out and get your point across to people.

The future of the Republican Party is in our hands. If we don’t work hard enough, we won’t get the results we expect. As young conservatives, we must not be afraid of the left and their walkouts and marches. Getting involved even in the smallest communities does make a difference, and your vote does count.

Go out and get involved. It may just be the best decision you ever make; for me, it was.

Eryn Martinez is a 19-year-old college student from Lansing, Michigan. Before moving back home to Lansing to get closer to the political action, she went to Northern Michigan University and was a huge part of their College Republicans club. Now, Eryn is currently an intern at the Michigan Republican Party.

The views expressed in this article are the opinion of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Lone Conservative staff.


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About Eryn Martinez

Northern Michigan University

Eryn Martinez is a 19-year-old college student from Lansing, Michigan. Before moving back home to Lansing to get closer to the political action, she went to Northern Michigan University and was a huge part of their College Republicans club. Now, Eryn is currently an intern at the Michigan Republican Party.

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