America’s Greatest Strength Has Always Been Her Diversity

by

Tuesday, March 14, 2017


America’s greatest strength has always been its diversity. We are an extraordinarily diverse nation; racially, intellectually, religiously, socially, politically, you name it. We often forget just how incredible this is. There are countries where everyone acts the same, dresses similarly, and believes the same thing because they are forced by law to.

There was a time where, for the most part, Americans from different demographics were able to coexist peacefully. This does not seem to be the case anymore.

It seems that every group representing a social issue or representing a certain demographic has an issue with someone else in the same space that appears to be irreconcilable. These groups viciously argue constantly and occasionally become violent.

To put it simply, we are in deep trouble and must address this issue before it becomes a problem too large to fix.

We have forgotten one important concept, respect.

Diversity is one of America’s greatest strengths, but the greatest strength we can have is respect for our fellow man. This appears to be a lost concept in today’s world.

We all come from different backgrounds which means that our opinions may differ; that’s fine. That’s actually a good thing. The issue is that we have forgotten how to disagree with our fellow Americans while also being respectful of them.

We have chosen to not simply disagree with others, but to hate and attempt to dehumanize them.

Dehumanizing people you do not agree with is currently a major issue in our country. If people do not share the same opinion and beliefs as we do, they must be wicked monsters who are incapable of redemption. This is an issue that comes from both sides of the political spectrum.

Now, I do know a lot of people who say “this comes from both sides” and don’t actually mean it but feel obligated to say it, so they can bash one side without people getting mad at them. But, in this case, I genuinely mean that this problem comes from both sides.

Anyone who disagrees with the left is a “racist,” “misogynist,” “homophobe,” “xenophobe,” “islamophobe,” and “bigot.” Anyone who disagrees with the right is a “libtard” or a “snowflake” who hates America.

Do you see the problem here?

People have forgotten that you can disagree with someone, but still be respectful of them as a human being.

To clarify, I am not saying that we should not debate. Debating is a crucial part of any functional society.

If there is something you disagree with, you should dispute it, but this can be done as an exchange of ideas in a civil manner. This is something we have forgotten how to do.

We don’t debate anymore, we hurl insults that try to bully the other person into believing we are right and morally superior.

The purpose of creating an argument or debate is to try and convince your opponent that you are correct. How is calling someone a “cuckservative” or a “libtard” going to help them see things from your point of view?

You cannot insult someone into submission or a change of opinion. That’s lunacy and not a constructive way of discussing differing opinions.

An example of the divisive debate over a political and social topic is the debate over transgenderism. If you disagree with transgenderism, you are a bigot. If you are transgender, you are a freak. These are horrible things that a good number of people from the left and right tell each other. But, as previously stated, we all have the ability disagree while still being respectful.

I personally do not agree with nor support transgenderism due to my religious and scientific beliefs. Does that automatically make me a horrible human being?

No, because while I disagree with the lifestyle transgendered people live, I still recognize that they are humans with feelings, and I choose to treat them as such using my basic understandings of respect and empathy.

This brings me to a secondary point; Respect is the key to a civilized society where everyone gets along, but another concept people need to have a grasp of is to simply mind their own business.

There are a select group of people in this life whom I care about: my family and friends. I care about how the decisions I make affects their lives and how their decisions affect my life, but I try not to focus on the personal decisions of others outside my personal web of people. This is not to say that I’m uninterested in the general welfare of the public, but as long as the decisions other people make do not affect those I care for nor others in a negative manner (and are within the bounds of the law), I absolutely do not care what you do.

I have my opinions and beliefs on many topics, but if you disagree and choose to act differently than what my beliefs are, I don’t care and I certainly won’t hate you for that because that would be silly.

There are some things that I do have trouble getting past. I am human like everyone else, and I am prone to anger, but that does not mean I can just lash out or be disrespectful to those with differing opinions. If you are a transgendered person and want to deal with it in whatever way you see fit, be it counseling or going through the surgery to make yourself look like the opposite gender, then you should.

I do not care what you do, but, while I disagree with you, I respect you as a human and will treat you with civility. That’s how things like this should be. Now, where I have a problem is when you come to me and tell me that I need to adjust my beliefs to make you feel better. That is not going to happen.

If you are a man and want to call yourself a woman or go by she, he, or it, that is fine with me. I cannot stress enough how little I care. However, do not expect me to call you the same, and do not criticize me for doing so. Otherwise, you have lost the respect I have given you. If I’m going to respect you as a person while politely disagreeing with your views, you should do the same for me. That is the foundation of a civilized society.

This is the problem though. People want everyone to see things the way that they do. That’s misguided at best, idiotic at worst.

To anyone who has petty political arguments where they hurl insults like a raving lunatic, I will not hesitate to identify that sort of behavior for what it is: immature and childish. You are not “owning” your political opponents by calling them a “libtard” or a “bigot.”

No matter how much we disagree on certain things, if you respect me, I will respect you. It’s as simple as that. If you are disrespectful, you do not deserve my respect.

Respect is the most powerful weapon a man or woman can have, but it is earned, not handed to you. If you want respect, you have to respect others. It’s simple math.

People talk about how fixing today’s society is very hard to do, but it actually isn’t. Respect people, stop caring so much about how others choose to live and what they choose to believe, and stop polarizing a situation. Once people commit to that, you have a functional society.

America’s greatest strength is her diversity. Any American’s greatest weapon is respect. America’s greatest weakness is stubbornness and pride. People have become too stubborn and prideful about their beliefs.

The best warrior isn’t the one who can kill all of his opponents. The best warrior is the one who can sit down and talk with with his opponent and no longer make them the opposition.

Respect people because they are people, stop caring too much about what other people do when it doesn’t affect you or those you care about, stop acting so childishly, and please put your stubbornness and pride aside. That is how you fix America. That is how a civilized, first-world nation should act.

Let’s start acting like America again.


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