My Experience with the Liberal Media

by

Monday, November 28, 2016


I learned first-hand to never trust liberal media.

I was recently interviewed by CBC reporter Matt Kwong.

When agreeing to the interview, I was under the impression that Mr. Kwong had/was interviewing a conglomerate of women and was doing a light-hearted, general article about women who support Republican presidential candidate and now President-elect Donald J. Trump.

Yet the article turned into a spotlight on myself and two other women, written in a condescending tone, in order to make female Trump supporters appear ignorant.

The article received thousands of shares and negative comments from outsiders and my direct peers, with much backlash refuting our views and intelligence, and accusing me of supporting rape culture. Backlash that has also made its way back to my university and sorority, sparking severe investigations and questioning of myself and my quoted comments by multiple administrators.

The interview began by Matt asking our opinions about the then-recently released recordings of Trump’s interaction with women and Trump’s comments such as “grab her by the pu**y,” a topic which lasted all of 3-5 minutes, followed by an hour-long interview involving intellectual conversation regarding economics, statistics, and interactions with other conservatives and liberals alike.

My response, and feelings, about Donald Trump’s “woman problem” was that no matter where you look online or on the streets today, you are going to see some form of promiscuity, and ironically, more and more, it seems that it is a left-wing agenda to promote sexual freedoms. No, I do not endorse molestation or rape culture, but do I think it’s a double standard that millennial women are supposed to be able embrace their sexuality however they chose and men (including Donald Trump) cannot without being labeled as misogynistic? Absolutely.

However, here’s what CBC took from my lengthy statement:

“‘You go to a party any day, and there’s fraternity guys—any guys—grabbing girls, doing this and that,’ said Kosick, 21, a junior. ‘I don’t think it’s out of the normal realm of things. I don’t think it’s as big a deal.’”

In original context, yes, I will stand by my statement that it’s not “as big a deal…’”

Not as big a deal as constitutional rights,

Not as big a deal as violating national security,

Not as big a deal as supporting our military,

Not as big a deal as keeping taxes affordable for all citizens,

Not as big a deal as an infant’s right to life,

Not as big a deal as valuing education,

Not as big a deal as protecting U.S. citizens from outside attack,

Not as big a deal as supporting change in the establishment…

In written context, though, I do not endorse the implication of my words by Mr. Kwong. Organizations and college campuses are constantly fighting against rape culture and I would never intend to denote these efforts, especially as a young woman myself.

Also, parallel to Donald Trump’s statements, there is no connotation of rape culture in my comments. There is no implication that the women in question are not consenting; it’s simply recollection of actions that have happened and seem to be condoned in any other context.

Both front-running candidates had flaws, and it is our right as U.S. citizens to be able to choose whose values we more so adhere to. I would never condemn a democratic citizen for their opinions as they have a right to them, along with a right to express them, so why is it okay to refer to people like me as ignorant, idiots, disturbing, and racist?

Apparently there are enough citizens who feel the Donald Trump’s “woman problem” is not “as big a deal” as other issues if he was still being considered as a serious presidential candidate, and has now been elected—so how am I the bad guy for using my First Amendment right, and saying so?

Why is it okay for a reporter to take keywords from an hour-long interview in order to make Republicans come across as sexual barbarians?

Perhaps because they were trying to distort reality and unlawfully persuade voters to support a corrupt establishment instead of a person with the United States and its citizens as his first priority.

If nothing else, this incident has truly opened my eyes to liberal bias in the media, having first-hand made statements regarding economics, immigration, social issues, and having the most controversial words plucked from my mouth, taken out of context, and purposefully misunderstood.

Not only were my words taken out of context to exploit myself, and the other women involved with the interview, but they were also applied to my association with various organizations and my geographical region—an example not only card-stacking, but also of hasty generalizations in Mr. Kwong’s line of reasoning within his article.

This election season has made me nothing but sympathetic to all of the potential presidential candidates, knowing they deal with such bias and backlash in the media daily and on a much larger scale. This experience has proven to me that the media tried to trick and sway citizens throughout the entire campaign process, and I have learned my lesson.

I was born in upstate New York, where I lived until I was 15, when my mother and I relocated to Alabama. The best thing my mother ever did for me was move me to a red state where I felt we were not alone in our political views — a comfort that was short lived as I began college. So here I stand, raising awareness for the fingertip rule, bras, valuing my education, and the Bill of Rights. Not sorry if that offends you.

The views expressed in this article are the opinion of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Lone Conservative staff.


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About Lani Kosick

University of South Alabama

I was born in upstate New York, where I lived until I was 15, when my mother and I relocated to Alabama. The best thing my mother ever did for me was move me to a red state where I felt we were not alone in our political views — a comfort that was short lived as I began college. So here I stand, raising awareness for the fingertip rule, bras, valuing my education, and the Bill of Rights. Not sorry if that offends you.

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